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Solomonic Grimoires - The Book Of Secrets (1.2 MB)

Cover of Solomonic Grimoires's Book The Book Of SecretsBook downloads: 3358
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According to Lewis Spence in An Encyclopaedia of Occultism, the Oupnekhat or Oupnekhata (Book of the Secret) is a work written in Persian providing the following instructions for the production of visions: "To produce the wise Maschqgui (vision), we must sit on a four-cornered base, namely the heels, and then close the gates of the body. The ears by the thumbs the eyes by the forefingers the nose by the middle the lips by the four other fingers. The lamp within the body will then be preserved from wind and moveme... More >>>
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Author:      Solomonic Grimoires
Format:      eBook
According to Lewis Spence in An Encyclopaedia of Occultism, the Oupnekhat or Oupnekhata (Book of the Secret) is a work written in Persian providing the following instructions for the production of visions: "To produce the wise Maschqgui (vision), we must sit on a four-cornered base, namely the heels, and then close the gates of the body. The ears by the thumbs the eyes by the forefingers the nose by the middle the lips by the four other fingers. The lamp within the body will then be preserved from wind and movement, and the whole body will be full of light. Like the tortoise, man must withdraw every sense within himself the heart must be guarded, and then Brahma will enter into him, like fire and lightning. In the great fire in the cavity of the heart a small flame will be lit up, and in its center is Atma (the soul) and he who destroys all worldly desires and wisdom will be like a hawk which has broken through the meshes of the net, and will have become one with the great being." Thus will he become Brahma-Atma (divine spirit), and will perceive by a light that far exceeds that of the sun. "Who, therefore, enters this path by Brahma must deny the world and its pleasures must only cover his nakedness, and staff in hand collect enough, but no more, alms to maintain life. The lesser ones only do this the greater throw aside pitcher and staff, and do not even read the Oupnekhata. "

This book is possibly a revision of one of the Hindu Upanishads. Oupnekhata is probably from a nineteenth-century German translation titled Das Oupnekhat die aus den Veden zusammengefasste Lebre von dem Brahm (Dresden, 1882), derived from an earlier Latin edition of 1801.

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The medieval Solomonic grimoires are, in fact, a sub-set of a larger literary genre - the folkloric "receipt-book." (The word "receipt", used in this sense, is an archaic form of the word "recipe.") A receipt-book was a hand-written journal of family and local folklore, passed down from generation to generation.

Solomonic grimoires attributed to King Solomon (as several others were). The known copies originated in the Middle Ages and later. The books contains several paragraphs and terms inspired by Talmudic texts and the Jewish Kabbalah teaching.

It is possible that the Key of Solomon inspired later works such as the Lemegeton, also called The Lesser Key of Solomon, although there are many differences between both books. What may have inspired the Lemegeton are the conjurations and rituals of purification, and in a less important way, the clothing and magic symbols.

Several versions of the Key of Solomon exist, in various translations, and with minor or significant differences. Most manuscripts date to the 16th or 17th century, but a prototype in Greek still survives from the 15th century.

The Solomonic mystics were unique because they were among the first humans in history to have access to the technology of paper and bound books.[3] (They were very often scholars, scientists or scribes.) Therefore, they naturally recorded much of their tradition into manuscripts called textbooks or "grammars" (French: grimoire). The appearance of these grimoires shocked Roman Catholic and many Protestant authorities so deeply, it triggered the Inquisitions and mass book burnings. What we know of Solomonic mysticism today comes largely from the grimoiric manuscripts that survived.

Today, there are many ceremonial groups that make limited use of the Solomonic material - most of them descended from or influenced by a late Victorian quasi-Masonic lodge called the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn. There have even been a number of modern Orders that focus entirely on the grimoires, though even they are influenced by post-Golden Dawn magickal methodology. Toward the end of the 20th Century, several books were released that present methods for summoning Angels and spirits based upon (or influenced by) Golden Dawn techniques.