Alexander Roberts - A Treatise Of Witchcraft (499.0 Kb)

Cover of Alexander Roberts's Book A Treatise Of WitchcraftBook downloads: 97
I find the idea of rating an historical publication like Alexandr Roberts' A Treatise of Witchcraft difficult, so I have opted not to do so. However, the content itself is very interesting. In his 1620 writing Roberts moves through a series of topics related to witchcraft: he begins by insisting that witches are real (and references historical sources like The Odyssey and the Bible as support), and then outlines exactly why witchcraft is to be abhorred by the Christian community. Roberts speaks of the spiritual salvation of ... More >>>Note that, unfortunately, not all my books can be downloaded or ordered on CD due to the restrictions of copyright. However, most of the books on this site do not have copyright restrictions. If you find any copyright violation, please contact me at [email protected]. I am very attentive to the issue of copyright and try to avoid any violations, but on the other hand to help all fans of magic to get access to information.
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Category 1:  Wicca and Witchcraft
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Author:      Alexander Roberts
Format:      eBook
I find the idea of rating an historical publication like Alexandr Roberts' A Treatise of Witchcraft difficult, so I have opted not to do so. However, the content itself is very interesting. In his 1620 writing Roberts moves through a series of topics related to witchcraft: he begins by insisting that witches are real (and references historical sources like The Odyssey and the Bible as support), and then outlines exactly why witchcraft is to be abhorred by the Christian community. Roberts speaks of the spiritual salvation of witches (which would ideally come just before their execution), defends the sentencing of witches, and details a specific example of witchcraft that occasioned the writing of his Treatise. The discussion of the contemporary case was intriguing, but I found Roberts' focus on gender roles particularly interesting. Throughout the text he assures his readers that not all witches are women, but he then goes on to explain why women are more susceptible to the Devil, and why the majority of magic practitioners are therefore women. As you can imagine, Roberts references everything from Eve to physical differences to an inclination towards the passionate as reasons why women are more likely to fall into Satan's grasp.

While the ideas presented would be familiar to anyone with even a passing knowledge of witchcraft trials, Roberts' treatise makes for a clear and forward primary source for the discussion of the occult.

About Author:

He was born at Marykirk, Kincardineshire, on 12 May 1826. He was the son of Alexander Roberts, a flax-spinner. He was educated at the grammar school and Bang's College, Old Aberdeen, where he graduated M.A. in March 1847, being the Simpson Greek prizeman.

He was presbyterian minister (1852-71) in Scotland and London. In 1864, being then minister at Carlton Hill, London, he was made D.D. of Edinburgh. He was also minister at St. John's Wood, and was a member of the New Testament revision company (1870-84). In 1872, he succeeded John Campbell Shairp in the chair of humanity at St. Andrews ; he was made emeritus professor in 1899. He died at St. Andrews, Mitcham Park, Surrey, on 8 March 1901.

He married on 2 December 1852 Mary Anne Speid (died 18 Jan, 1911), and had fourteen children, of whom four sons and eight daughters survived him Roberts co-operated with Sir James Donaldson as editor and part translator of the English versions of ecclesiastical writers published as the 'Ante-Nicene Christian Library' (1867-72, 24 vols.); he translated also the 'Works of Sulpitius Severus' (1895) in the 'Select Library of Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers.' He is best known for the series of works in which he maintains that Greek was the habitual speech of our Lord, a conclusion which has not met with general favour, despite the ability with which Roberts managed his case.

He was co-editor of the first major edition of the Ante-Nicene Fathers.