Charles William Johnson - Ancient Mesoamerican Reckoning Names Compared to Ancient Egyptian (70.0 Kb)

Cover of Charles William Johnson's Book Ancient Mesoamerican Reckoning Names Compared to Ancient EgyptianBook downloads: 314
In previous essays within the Earth/matriX series, we have examined the similarity of vocabularies between the ancient Maya system, Nahuatl and ancient Egyptian (Kemi). In addition to the numerous similarities already noted among theselanguages, we shall now present a few selected comparisons of the more specialized glyph names of the ancient Maya and to similar concepts in ancient Egyptian.As we have mentioned earlier, with only a single hit whereby one particular word-concept of one language is related through contact to a... More >>>Note that, unfortunately, not all my books can be downloaded or ordered on CD due to the restrictions of copyright. However, most of the books on this site do not have copyright restrictions. If you find any copyright violation, please contact me at [email protected]. I am very attentive to the issue of copyright and try to avoid any violations, but on the other hand to help all fans of magic to get access to information.
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Author:      Charles William Johnson
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In previous essays within the Earth/matriX series, we have examined the similarity of vocabularies between the ancient Maya system, Nahuatl and ancient Egyptian (Kemi). In addition to the numerous similarities already noted among these

languages, we shall now present a few selected comparisons of the more specialized glyph names of the ancient Maya and to similar concepts in ancient Egyptian.

As we have mentioned earlier, with only a single hit whereby one particular word-concept of one language is related through contact to a word-concept of the other language, one would have an example of contact between these two

supposedly separate ancient cultures. Our reasoning in making these studies in comparative linguistics is that if the ancient reckoning systems of both the ancient Maya and the ancient Kemi reveal strict similarities, then their languages should provide traces of contact as well.

In order to establish the idea of a possible point of contact between the ancient Mesoamerican culture of the Maya or the Aztecs, with the ancient Egyptians (Kemi), we only require a single example of comparative linguistics being a match. Therefore, we shall not review a lot of examples, but only selected examples, ones that seem to provide a fit between the two language systems.

About Author:

Charles Willison Johnson (26 October 1863 - 19 July 1932) was an American naturalist who specialized in entomology (especially Diptera) and malacology, making significant contributions in both fields.

He was a mentor and inspiration to many students and young scientists such as William J. Clench (who founded a publication named Johnsonia in his honor).

Johnson was Curator of the Wagner Free Institute of Science, 1888-1903, then was Principal Curator at the Boston Society of Natural History, 1903-1932.

He assisted Henry Augustus Pilsbry with The Nautilus, an important American malacological publication. (Although both were credited on the title page as "Editors and Publishers", Johnson was the business manager and Pilsbry was the editor, with Johnson acting as editor when Pilsbry was on extended field expeditions.)

Biography

Charles Johnson was born to Albert Fletcher Johnson and Sarah Willison Johnson in Morris Plains, New Jersey. He attended public and private schools at Morristown, New Jersey. At age 17 he moved to St. Augustine, Florida, and threw himself into an intensive and energetic study of the area's fauna. His activity caught the eye of Joseph Willcox, a trustee of the Wagner Free Institute of Philadelphia, who was in Florida on a field trip. Willcox invited Johnson to become the Wagner's curator, so in 1888 Johnson moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and took up that post. During his fourteen-year tenure, he greatly improved and modernized the Institute's collections. He also was asked to curate two special collections of the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia.

In 1903 he accepted the post of chief curator at the Boston Society of Natural History at the passing of the previous curator (Professor Alpheus Hyatt). He remained at that position until his death at age 68, in Brookline, Massachusetts.

On 14 January 1897 he married Carrie W. Ford in Philadelphia. Her father was a prominent Philadelphia personality, known for his extensive collection of shells. They had no children; she died 16 July 1931 at Brookline.

His co-workers estimated that during his lifetime, Johnson had published at least 130 articles on the topic of entomology, and at least 100 articles on molluscan subjects.

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