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Anonymous - The Lawes Against Witches (94.0 Kb)

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The LAWES against WITCHES, AND CONJURATION AND Some brief Notes and Observations for the Discovery of WITCHES. Being very usefull for these Times, wherein the DEVIL reignes and prevailes over the soules of poor Creatures, in drawing them to that crying Sin of WITCH-CRAFT.Be it enacted by the King our Soveraigne Lord the Lords Spirituall and Temporall, and the Commons in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, that the Statute made in the fifth yeare of the Reigne of our late Soveraigne Lady o... More >>>
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Category 1:  Wicca and Witchcraft
Category 2: 
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Author:      Anonymous
Format:      eBook
The LAWES against WITCHES, AND CONJURATION AND Some brief Notes and Observations for the Discovery of WITCHES. Being very usefull for these Times, wherein the DEVIL reignes and prevailes over the soules of poor Creatures, in drawing them to that crying Sin of WITCH-CRAFT.

Be it enacted by the King our Soveraigne Lord the Lords Spirituall and Temporall, and the Commons in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, that the Statute made in the fifth yeare of the Reigne of our late Soveraigne Lady of most Famous and Happy memory, Queen Elizabeth, Entituled, An Act against Conjurations, Inchantments and Witchcrafts be from the Feast of Saint Michael the Archangel next comming, for and concerning all offences to bee committed after the same Feast, utterly repealed. And for the better restraining the said offences, and more severe punishing the same, be it further Enacted by the Authority aforesaid That if any person or persons, after the said Feast of St. Michael the Archangell next comming, shall use, practise, or exercise any invocation or conjuration of an evil and wicked spirit: or shall consult, covenant with, entertaine, imploy, feed, or reward any evil and wicked spirit, to or for any intent or purpose or take up any dead man, woman, or child out of his, her, or their grave, or any other place where the dead body resteth or the skin, bone, or any other part of any dead person, to be imployed, or used in any manner of Witchcraft, Sorcery, Charms, or Inchantment, or shall use, practise, or exercise, any Witchcraft, Inchantment, Charms, or Sorcery, whereby any person shall be Killed, Destroyed, Wasted, Consumed, Pined, or Lamed, in His or Her body, or any part thereof that then every such Offender, or Offenders, their Ayders, Abetters, and Councellors, being of any of the said offences duly and lawfully Convicted and Attainted, shall suffer paines of death as a Felon or Felons, and shall lose the privilege and benefit of Clergy and Sanctuary.

About Author:

"Anonymous" of course means "without a name" and is used when the author is not known--or sometimes, when a story develops out of an oral tradition over generations with possibly many storytellers contributing to and revising the tale before it is finally written down and becomes literature.

A notable amount of ancient and medieval literature is anonymous. This is not only due to the lack of documents from a period, but also due to an interpretation of the author's role that differs considerably from the romantic interpretation of the term in use today. Ancient and Medieval authors were often overawed by the classical writers and the Church Fathers and tended to re-tell and embellish stories they had heard or read rather than invent new stories. And even when they did, they often claimed to be handing down something from an auctor instead. From this point of view, the names of the individual authors seemed much less important, and therefore many important works were never attributed to any specific person.