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Parker Fillmore - Czechoslovak Fairy Tales (618.0 Kb)

Cover of Parker Fillmore's Book Czechoslovak Fairy TalesBook downloads: 91
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Fairy tale is an English language term for a type of short narrative corresponding to the French phrase conte de f'ee, the German term M"archen, the Italian fiaba, the Polish ba's'n or the Swedish saga. Only a small number of the stories thus designated explicitly refer to fairies. Nonetheless, the stories may be distinguished from other folk narratives such as legends and traditions (which generally involve belief in the veracity of the events described) and explicitly moral tales, including beast fables. Fairy tales typica... More >>>
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Category 1:  Fairy Tales
Category 2:  Religion and Mythology
Category 3: 
Author:      Parker Fillmore
Format:      eBook
Fairy tale is an English language term for a type of short narrative corresponding to the French phrase conte de f'ee, the German term M"archen, the Italian fiaba, the Polish ba's'n or the Swedish saga. Only a small number of the stories thus designated explicitly refer to fairies. Nonetheless, the stories may be distinguished from other folk narratives such as legends and traditions (which generally involve belief in the veracity of the events described) and explicitly moral tales, including beast fables. Fairy tales typically feature such folkloric characters as fairies, goblins, elves, trolls, giants or gnomes, and usually magic or enchantments. Often the story will involve a far-fetched sequence of events. In less technical contexts, the term is also used to describe something blessed with unusual happiness, as in "fairy tale ending" or "fairy tale romance" (though not all fairy tales end happily). Colloquially, a "fairy tale" or "fairy story" can also mean any far-fetched story or tall tale. In cultures where demons and witches are perceived as real, fairy tales may merge into legends, where the narrative is perceived both by teller and hearers as being grounded in historical truth. However, unlike legends and epics, they usually do not contain more than superficial references to religion and actual places, people, and events they take place once upon a time rather than in actual times. Fairy tales are found in oral and in literary form. The history of the fairy tale is particularly difficult to trace, because only the literary forms can survive. Still, the evidence of literary works at least indicates that fairy tales have existed for thousands of years, although not perhaps recognized as a genre the name "fairy tale" was first ascribed to them by Madame d'Aulnoy. Many of today's fairy tales have evolved from centuries-old stories that have appeared, with variations, in multiple cultures around the world. Fairy tales, and works derived from fairy tales, are still written today. The older fairy tales were intended for an audience of adults as well as children, but they were associated with children as early as the writings of the pr'ecieuses the Brothers Grimm titled their collection Children's and Household Tales, and the link with children has only grown stronger with time. Folklorists have classified fairy tales in various ways. Among the most notable are the Aarne-Thompson classification system and the morphological analysis of Vladimir Propp. Other folklorists have interpreted the tales' significance, but no school has been definitively established for the meaning of the tales.

About Author:

Parker Fillmore, author of The Laughing Prince, was a collector and editor of fairy tales from Czechoslovak tales and Slavic folklore. The Laughing Prince is classified as Slavic fairy tales, but the collection is also compromised of fairy tales and folklore for Bosnia, Bulgaria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Montenegro, Russia, the Ukraine, Slovakia, Slovenia, Serbia, Poland and others. His other work, Czechoslovak Fairy Tales, is another collection of fairy tales. Fillmore enjoyed the fairy tales he heard, and received a scholarship from patrons to spend time collecting these iconic tales that were part of the heritage of many he encountered in Czechoslovak and elsewhere. He referred to the tales as "charming little tales of sentiment" and called a few "full of stark simplicity and grim humor." He also calls the tales his "own renderings" and not exactly translations, an important distinction to make. He does say, however, that he didn't invent new details, but instead made the stories his own.

Fairy tales by Parker Fillmore (partial bibliography):

- Beauty and the Horns - The Story of an Enchanted Maiden
- The Best Wish - The Story of Three Brothers and an Angel
- The Betrothal Gifts: The Story of Kubik and the Frog
- The Bird with the Golden Gizzard: The Story of Two Brothers
- The Dragon's Strength - The Story of the Youngest Prince Who Killed the Sparrow
- The Devil's Hide: The Story of the Boy Who Wouldn't Lose His Temper
- The Enchanted Peafowl - The Story of the Golden Apples, the Wicked Dragon, and the Magic Horse
- The Enchanted Grouse: The Story of Helli and the Little Locked Box
- The Forest Bride: The Story of a Little Mouse Who Was a Princess
- Familiar Faces I: Mary, Mary, So Contrary!
- Familiar Faces II: Jane, Jane Don't Complain!
- Familiar Faces III: Susan Walker, What a Talker!
- The Flaming Horse: The Story of a Country Where the Sun Never Shines
- The Girl in the Chest - The Story of the Third Sister Who was Brave and Good
- Grandfather's Eyes: The Story of Three Wicked Yezinkas
- The Golden Spinning-Wheel: The Story of King Dobromil and the Good Dobrunka
- The Golden Godmother: The Story of Poor Lucas
- The Golden Duck: The Story of Prince Raduz and the Faithful Ludmila
- Katcha and the Devil: The Story of a Clinging Vine
- The Laughing Prince: The Boy Who Could Talk Nonsense
- The Little Lame Fox - The Story of the Youngest Brother Who Found the Magic Grape-Vine and Married the Golden Maiden
- The Little Lame Fox - The Story of the Youngest Brother Who Found the Magic Grape-Vine and Married the Golden Maiden
- The Little Singing Frog - The Story of a Girl Whose Parents were Ashamed of Her
- Lord and Master - The Story of the Man Who Understood the Language of the Animals
- Log: The Story of the Hero Who Released the Sun
- Little Sister: The Story of Suyettar and the Nine Brothers
- Longshanks, Girth, and Keen: The Story of Three Wonderful Serving Men
- Mighty Mikko: The Story of a Poor Woodsman and a Grateful Fox
- Mikko the Fox - Adventure I: The Animals Take a Bite
- Mikko, the Fox - Adventure II: The Partners
- The Nightingale in the Mosque - The Story of the Sultan's Youngest Son and the Princess Flower o' the World
- The Pigeon's Bride - The Story of a Princess Who Kissed and Told
- Prince Bayaya: The Story of a Magic Horse
- Rattle-Rattle-Rattle and Chink-Chink-Chink: The Story of Long Beard, the Dwarf, and the Two Sisters
- The Silver Tracks - The Story of the Poor Man Who Befriended a Beggar
- The Story That Never Ends
- The True Bride: The Story of Ilona and the King's Son
- The Three Chests: The Story of the Wicked Old Man of the Sea
- The Terrible Olli: The Story of an Honest Finn and a Wicked Troll
- The Three Golden Hairs: The Story of a Charcoal-Burner's Son Who Married a Princess
- The Three Citrons: The Story of a Prince Who Climbed the Glass Hill
- The Vilas' Spring - The Story of the Brother Who Knew that Good was Stronger than Evil
- The Wonderful Hair - The Story of a Poor Man Who Dreamed of an Angel
- The Wood Maiden: The Story of Betushka and the Golden Birch Leaves