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Aristotle - On Dreams (27.0 Kb)

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WE must, in the next place, investigate the subject of the dream, and first inquire to which of the faculties of the soul it presents itself, i.e. whether the affection is one which pertains to the faculty of intelligence or to that of sense-perception for these are the only faculties within us by which we acquire knowledge.If, then, the exercise of the faculty of sight is actual seeing, that of the auditory faculty, hearing, and, in general that of the faculty of sense-perception, perceiving and if there are some pe... More >>>
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Category 1:  Mystic and Occultism
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Author:      Aristotle
Format:      eBook
WE must, in the next place, investigate the subject of the dream, and first inquire to which of the faculties of the soul it presents itself, i.e. whether the affection is one which pertains to the faculty of intelligence or to that of sense-perception for these are the only faculties within us by which we acquire knowledge.

If, then, the exercise of the faculty of sight is actual seeing, that of the auditory faculty, hearing, and, in general that of the faculty of sense-perception, perceiving and if there are some perceptions common to the senses, such as figure, magnitude, motion, c., while there are others, as colour, sound, taste, peculiar [each to its own sense] and further, if all creatures, when the eyes are closed in sleep, are unable to see, and the analogous statement is true of the other senses, so that manifestly we perceive nothing when asleep we may conclude that it is not by sense-perception we perceive a dream.