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Louis Claude De Saint Martin - Man His True Nature And Ministry (2.3 MB)

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Some account of Saint-Martin (Le Philosophe inconnu) and his writings has been given in the preface to his 'Correspondence with Baron Liebestorf', recently published and it is necessary hero only to say that the book of which a translation is now presented to the reader, 'Le Ministere de l'Homme-Esprit', was probably the last, as it certainly was the most important, of his works. It was published in Paris, in 1802: he died the following year.Saint-Martin wrote to his friend the Baron : (Let. cx. of the above 'Corresponde... More >>>
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Author:      Louis Claude De Saint Martin
Format:      eBook
Some account of Saint-Martin (Le Philosophe inconnu) and his writings has been given in the preface to his 'Correspondence with Baron Liebestorf', recently published and it is necessary hero only to say that the book of which a translation is now presented to the reader, 'Le Ministere de l'Homme-Esprit', was probably the last, as it certainly was the most important, of his works. It was published in Paris, in 1802: he died the following year.

Saint-Martin wrote to his friend the Baron : (Let. cx. of the above 'Correspondence') : "The only initiation which I preach and seek with all the ardour of my soul is that by which we may enter into the heart of God, and make God's heart enter into us, there to form an indissoluble marriage, which will make us the friend, brother, and spouse of our Divine Redeemer ['the violent take it by force:' Matt. xi. 12.]. There is no other mystery, to arrive at this holy initiation, than to go more and more into the depths of our being, and not let go till we can bring forth the living, vivifying root, because then all the fruit we ought to bear, according to our kind, will be produced within us and without us naturally as we see is the case with earthly trees, because they are adherent to their own roots, and incessantly draw in their sap." These few words suffice to show the scope, intent, or spirit, and point to the modus operandi, of all Saint-Martin's works, and of none more truly so than of the work before us.

The reader will observe that Saint-Martin affects to designate God by the name of His Attribute which is immediately in question or in action: thus we find Him called Supreme Love, - or Wisdom, - or Ruler, - The Principle, - Source, - and such like. In a work which seeks the ground of all things, this is, no doubt, in itself, strictly as it ought to be - but, if it should sound inharmoniously to some readers, let them remember that Saint-Martin wrote for the French of the Revolution, who had decreed that there was no God, but who had no objection to recognize Him in His Attributes. In this way Saint-Martin undermined the ramparts of infidelity.

With these few remarks the Editor commits the book to the reader, and wishes him God speed. - Topsham, 1864

About Author:

Louis Claude, Comte de Saint-Martin (January 18, 1743 - October 13, 1803) led a gentle and blameless life in the midst of the holocaust of the French Revolution. He was a true Theosophist and an Adept. His times witnessed human distress, degradation and disintegration to a degree which made many cynical and nihilistic. Saint-Martin calmly drew attention to the 'ministry of man,' his immortal nature and divine destiny, exemplifying in his own life that one can perceive timeless truths in temporal chaos.

Born in Amboise, Touraine, his early life is unknown. Tradition suggests that at about the age of fifteen he met the Comte de Saint Germain who had taken up residence in Chateau Chambord a few miles from Amboise. After studying jurisprudence, Saint-Martin became King's Advocate at the High Court of Tours, but his interest in the roots of human justice outweighed his tolerance of judicial technicality. He appealed to his influential friend, the Duc de Choiseul, to help him gain another post, and in 1766 he became a lieutenant in the Regiment de Foix garrisoned in Bordeaux. Then, in 1767, he met Don Martinez Pasquales, a Rosicrucian, founder of a Masonic order and student of the Kabbalah.

Pasquales founded his order in Paris and established an occult school in Bordeaux called the Order of Elect Cohens, which Saint-Martin joined in 1768. Deeply impressed by the presence of his teacher and by his doctrines, Saint-Martin renounced his military career in 1771. His seriousness of purpose and devotion to his teacher elevated him to the head of the school when Pasquales had to travel to Santo Domingo in the West Indies. Though the school taught the highest ethical principles, its interest in practical occult powers struck Saint-Martin as dangerously premature for the spiritual progress of its members, even though they included the Comte d'Hauterive, Abbe Fournie, Marquise de la Croix and probably Cazotte. Saint-Martin travelled between Bordeaux, Paris and Lyons in an attempt to refound the school on firmer spiritual foundations. When Pasquales died in Port-au-Prince in 1774, Saint-Martin moved to Lyons and established a secret Masonic rite called the "Rectified Rite of Saint-Martin" in an effort to revivify occult Masonry as a bastion against the growing materialism of the Encyclopaedists.