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Hesketh Bell - Obeah Witchcraft in the West Indies (4.6 MB)

Cover of Hesketh Bell's Book Obeah Witchcraft in the West IndiesBook downloads: 70
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Obeah (sometimes spelled Obi, Obea or Obia) is a term used in the West Indies to refer to folk magic, sorcery, and religious practices derived from West African, and specifically Igbo origin. Obeah is similar to other African derived religions including Palo, Voodoo, Santeria, rootwork, and most of all hoodoo. Obeah is practiced in Suriname, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana, Barbados, Belize, the Bahamas and other Caribbean countries.Obeah is associated with both benign and malignant magic, charms, luck, and with mystici... More >>>
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Category 1:  Wicca and Witchcraft
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Author:      Hesketh Bell
Format:      eBook
Obeah (sometimes spelled Obi, Obea or Obia) is a term used in the West Indies to refer to folk magic, sorcery, and religious practices derived from West African, and specifically Igbo origin. Obeah is similar to other African derived religions including Palo, Voodoo, Santeria, rootwork, and most of all hoodoo. Obeah is practiced in Suriname, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana, Barbados, Belize, the Bahamas and other Caribbean countries.

Obeah is associated with both benign and malignant magic, charms, luck, and with mysticism in general. In some Caribbean nations, Obeah refers to folk religions of the African diaspora. In some cases, aspects of these folk religions have survived through synthesis with Christian symbolism and practice introduced by European colonials and slave owners. Casual observation may conclude that Christian symbolism is incorporated into Obeah worship, but in fact may represent clandestine worship and religious protest.