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Anonymous - Beltane Pagan Ritual of Interest to Neo Pagans (83.0 Kb)

Cover of Anonymous's Book Beltane Pagan Ritual of Interest to Neo PagansBook downloads: 98
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This a Pagan Ritual file, of interest to Neo-Pagans, specifically Wiccan based religions.The Beltane ritual, performed on or around May 1st, has one element that almost everyone used to be familiar with: the Maypole. Years ago, good girls at Vassar, the local woman's college (now coed), used to dance the maypole they had a giddy, giggly time, usually.Beltane is observed by Neopagans in various forms, and by a variety of names. As forms of Neopaganism can vary largely from tradition to tradition, representations can vary... More >>>
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Category 1:  Rituals and Rites
Category 2:  Pagans and Paganism
Category 3: 
Author:      Anonymous
Format:      eBook
This a Pagan Ritual file, of interest to Neo-Pagans, specifically Wiccan based religions.

The Beltane ritual, performed on or around May 1st, has one element that almost everyone used to be familiar with: the Maypole. Years ago, good girls at Vassar, the local woman's college (now coed), used to dance the maypole they had a giddy, giggly time, usually.

Beltane is observed by Neopagans in various forms, and by a variety of names. As forms of Neopaganism can vary largely from tradition to tradition, representations can vary considerably despite the shared name. Some celebrate in a manner as close as possible to how the Ancient Celts and Living Celtic cultures have maintained the traditions, while others observe the holiday with rituals taken from numerous other unrelated sources, Celtic culture being only one of the sources used.

Wiccans and Wiccan-inspired Neopagans celebrate a variation of Beltane as a Sabbat, one of the eight solar holidays. Although the holiday may use features of the Gaelic Bealtaine, such as the bonfire, it bears more relation to the Germanic May Day festival, both in its significance (focusing on fertility) and its rituals (such as maypole dancing). Some Wiccans celebrate "High Beltaine" by enacting a ritual union of the May Lord and May Lady.

Among the Wiccan Sabbats, Beltane is a cross-quarter day it is celebrated in the northern hemisphere on May 1 and in the southern hemisphere on November 1. Beltane follows Ostara and precedes Midsummer.

About Author:

"Anonymous" of course means "without a name" and is used when the author is not known--or sometimes, when a story develops out of an oral tradition over generations with possibly many storytellers contributing to and revising the tale before it is finally written down and becomes literature.

A notable amount of ancient and medieval literature is anonymous. This is not only due to the lack of documents from a period, but also due to an interpretation of the author's role that differs considerably from the romantic interpretation of the term in use today. Ancient and Medieval authors were often overawed by the classical writers and the Church Fathers and tended to re-tell and embellish stories they had heard or read rather than invent new stories. And even when they did, they often claimed to be handing down something from an auctor instead. From this point of view, the names of the individual authors seemed much less important, and therefore many important works were never attributed to any specific person.