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Benjamin Rosenbaum - The Ant King A California Fairy Tale (178.0 Kb)

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Fairy tale is an English language term for a type of short narrative corresponding to the French phrase conte de f'ee, the German term M"archen, the Italian fiaba, the Polish ba's'n or the Swedish saga. Only a small number of the stories thus designated explicitly refer to fairies. Nonetheless, the stories may be distinguished from other folk narratives such as legends and traditions (which generally involve belief in the veracity of the events described) and explicitly moral tales, including beast fables. Fairy tales typica... More >>>
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Category 1:  Fairy Tales
Category 2:  Religion and Mythology
Category 3: 
Author:      Benjamin Rosenbaum
Format:      eBook
Fairy tale is an English language term for a type of short narrative corresponding to the French phrase conte de f'ee, the German term M"archen, the Italian fiaba, the Polish ba's'n or the Swedish saga. Only a small number of the stories thus designated explicitly refer to fairies. Nonetheless, the stories may be distinguished from other folk narratives such as legends and traditions (which generally involve belief in the veracity of the events described) and explicitly moral tales, including beast fables. Fairy tales typically feature such folkloric characters as fairies, goblins, elves, trolls, giants or gnomes, and usually magic or enchantments. Often the story will involve a far-fetched sequence of events. In less technical contexts, the term is also used to describe something blessed with unusual happiness, as in "fairy tale ending" or "fairy tale romance" (though not all fairy tales end happily). Colloquially, a "fairy tale" or "fairy story" can also mean any far-fetched story or tall tale. In cultures where demons and witches are perceived as real, fairy tales may merge into legends, where the narrative is perceived both by teller and hearers as being grounded in historical truth. However, unlike legends and epics, they usually do not contain more than superficial references to religion and actual places, people, and events they take place once upon a time rather than in actual times. Fairy tales are found in oral and in literary form. The history of the fairy tale is particularly difficult to trace, because only the literary forms can survive. Still, the evidence of literary works at least indicates that fairy tales have existed for thousands of years, although not perhaps recognized as a genre the name "fairy tale" was first ascribed to them by Madame d'Aulnoy. Many of today's fairy tales have evolved from centuries-old stories that have appeared, with variations, in multiple cultures around the world. Fairy tales, and works derived from fairy tales, are still written today. The older fairy tales were intended for an audience of adults as well as children, but they were associated with children as early as the writings of the pr'ecieuses the Brothers Grimm titled their collection Children's and Household Tales, and the link with children has only grown stronger with time. Folklorists have classified fairy tales in various ways. Among the most notable are the Aarne-Thompson classification system and the morphological analysis of Vladimir Propp. Other folklorists have interpreted the tales' significance, but no school has been definitively established for the meaning of the tales.

About Author:

Benjamin Rosenbaum (born August 23, 1969) is an American science fiction, fantasy, and literary fiction writer and computer programmer, whose stories have been finalists for the Hugo Award, the Nebula Award, the Theodore Sturgeon Award, the BSFA award, and the World Fantasy Award. Rosenbaum currently lives in Washington, DC, with his wife Esther and children Aviva and Noah.

Born in New York but raised in Arlington, Virginia, Rosenbaum received degrees in computer science and religious studies from Brown University.

His past software development positions include designing software for the National Science Foundation, designing software for the D.C. city government, and being one of the founders of Digital Addiction (which created the online game Sanctum).

His first professionally published story appeared in 2001. His work has been published in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, Asimov's Science Fiction, Harper's, Nature, and McSweeney's Quarterly Concern. It has also appeared on the websites Strange Horizons and Infinite Matrix, and in various year's best anthologies. The Ant King and Other Stories, a collection of Rosenbaum's short fiction, was published by Small Beer Press.

Benjamin Rosenbaum's selected stories:

- "True Names" (2008) (online), collaboration with Cory Doctorow, was nominated for a Hugo Award.
- "Anthroptic" (2007) (online) collaboration with visual artist Ethan Ham
- "A Siege of Cranes"(2006) (online) was nominated for a World Fantasy Award.
- "Embracing-the-New" (2004) (online) was nominated for Nebula Award for Best Short Story.
- "Biographical Notes to 'A Discourse on the Nature of Causality, with Air-Planes', by Benjamin Rosenbaum" (2004) (online) was nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Novelette.
- "Start the Clock" (2004) (online), was written for the book project Exquisite Corpuscle, where each contributor produced something inspired by the previous contributor's piece (they weren't shown the preceding pieces). It was nominated for a Theodore Sturgeon Award.
- "The House Beyond Your Sky"(2006) (online) was nominated for a BSFA Award and a Hugo Award.
He released all seven stories under Creative Commons licenses, in the latter three cases allowing others to modify the work.

Source: wiki