Members Online: 329

John Duffy - Reactions of Two Byzantine Intellectuals to the Theory and Practice of Magic (Byzantine Magic Excerpt) (929.0 Kb)

Cover of John Duffy's Book Reactions of Two Byzantine Intellectuals to the Theory and Practice of Magic (Byzantine Magic Excerpt)Book downloads: 32
To get magic book to you mailbox every week please subscribe to my mailing list, using form below
Name:
Email:
This is an extract from: Byzantine Magic edited by Henry Maguire.This paper will address the issue of Byzantine intellectual attitudes to magic in the eleventh and twelfth centuries and will focus mainly on two figures, Michael Psellos and Michael Italikos, with an eye to the two aspects of theory and practice. If Psellos receives a somewhat larger share of attention herein, it is not only because he was a lion he also contributed to the survival of, and commented on, an important body of material that is central to the ... More >>>
Book can be downloaded, and can be ordered on CD.
Note that, unfortunately, not all my books can be downloaded or ordered on CD due to the restrictions of copyright. However, most of the books on this site do not have copyright restrictions. If you find any copyright violation, please contact me at christina.debes@gmail.com. I am very attentive to the issue of copyright and try to avoid any violations, but on the other hand to help all fans of magic to get access to information.
Editors Rating John Duffy's Books List
Community Rating
Download All Books
Category 1:  Mystic and Occultism
Category 2: 
Category 3: 
Author:      John Duffy
Format:      Arch
This is an extract from: Byzantine Magic edited by Henry Maguire.

This paper will address the issue of Byzantine intellectual attitudes to magic in the eleventh and twelfth centuries and will focus mainly on two figures, Michael Psellos and Michael Italikos, with an eye to the two aspects of theory and practice. If Psellos receives a somewhat larger share of attention herein, it is not only because he was a lion he also contributed to the survival of, and commented on, an important body of material that is central to the topic under review. For Byzantine literati of the eleventh and twelfth centuries, the world of Hellenic magic and mysticism was part of their cultural heritage, and they felt obliged to take account of its existence in one way or another. Acknowledgment did vary, ranging, for example, from the nodding acquaintance of an Anna comnena to the intimate familiarity of a Michael Psellos.