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Regulagedda Akshay - Panchanga Tantra The Magic of the Indian Calendar System (2.0 MB)

Cover of Regulagedda Akshay's Book Panchanga Tantra The Magic of the Indian Calendar SystemBook downloads: 203
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The fable of Apara Ganita and the Mystical Garden of Enchanted Numbers is obviously fictional. The inspiration is Leelavati Ganitam, a chapter in the ancient mathematical treatise, the Siddhanta Siromani, written by Bhaskaracharya in 1150CE. The Leelavati Ganitam is fascinating not only for its treatment of indeterminate analysis and a method to solve Pell's Equation, but also, as a Canadian university's website on mathematical history puts it, for its poetic conversation between the narrator and a narratee named Leelavati1.... More >>>
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Author:      Regulagedda Akshay
Format:      eBook
The fable of Apara Ganita and the Mystical Garden of Enchanted Numbers is obviously fictional. The inspiration is Leelavati Ganitam, a chapter in the ancient mathematical treatise, the Siddhanta Siromani, written by Bhaskaracharya in 1150CE. The Leelavati Ganitam is fascinating not only for its treatment of indeterminate analysis and a method to solve Pell's Equation, but also, as a Canadian university's website on mathematical history puts it, for its poetic conversation between the narrator and a narratee named Leelavati1. The similarity between this poetic construct and the conversation between Apara Ganita and the dwara palika is probably noticeable. Frame stories are not common for scientific research papers, but they certainly have a historical precedent.