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Robert Fludd's Biography (Photos)

Robert Fludd
Dr. Robert Fludd better known to occultists as Robertus de Flactibus was born at Milgate House, Parish of Bearsted, County of Kent, England, in 1574. Of all English operative magicians he alone is invariably known as "The Great English Rosicrucian." The arms and monuments of the Fludd family are still to be seen in Bearsted Church.

He was a fifth son. At 17 entered St. John's College, Oxford; graduated B. A. February 3, 1596-7; M. A. July 8, 1598. Received degrees in same class with William Laud, later the famous Archbishop of Canterbury, of whom he was an intimate friend.

Studied Physics and Medicine; traveled in France, Spain, Italy, and Germany for six years and later studied in Arabia and Egypt. Performed marvelous cures and experiments, one of which is recorded as "extracting a deadly venom, most pernicious and malignant out of a man." Returned to England, entered Christ Church College, Oxford. Received degrees of M. B. and M. D. May 16, 1605. Made a Fellow September 20, 1609. Censor 1618, 1627, 1633, and 1634. Practiced medicine in London in Fenchurch Street, afterwards in Coleman Street maintaining a handsome establishment.

During his Fellowship it was said of him, "with a large share of egotism and assurance, a strong leaning toward chemistry, a contempt of Galenical medicine and a sincere belief in the doctrines of the Rosie Cross - he startled the Censors by his conduct within the College no less than by his conduct without it."

Michael Maier introduced the Rosicrucian Order into England, about 1620, but although he and Fludd were friends, Fludd was initiated abroad.

Dr. Robert Fludd died September 8, 1637, at his house in the Parish of St. Catherine, Coleman Street. His place of rest in Bearsted Church is marked by a "Stone" prepared by himself.

His first book was "Apologia Compediaria Fraternitatem de Rosea Crucis Suspicionis et Infamiae Maculis Aspersam, veritates quaesi Fluctibus abluens et abstergens. Laydae 1616. Fludd declares its purpose to be "to protect the purity of the Society, and to wipe off the spots of shame smeared over the Brothers as with a stream of pure wisdom." Many other books followed.

Fludd is recorded as "the Chief English Representative of that school of medical mystics who laid claim to the possession of the Key to Universal Science."